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Steel guitar originates and lives on in ...

The steel guitar legacy begins in Laie The Polynesian Cultural Center has a unique connection to the Hawaiian steel guitar: Its inventor was born in Laie, home of the PCC, in 1874. Young Joseph Kekukuupenaokamehamehakanaiaupuni Apuakehau, who shortened his stage name to Kekuku, invented the steel guitar in 1885. It is sometimes said he laid a guitar across his lap and moved the back of metal comb across the frets to create the first distinctive Hawaiian steel guitar sounds. Almost 140 years later, most players now use a steel bar about three inches long to create the...
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Volunteer Michael Theobald remembers pre...

Elder Michael and Sister Shauna Theobald have recently completed 13 months as senior training missionaries at the Polynesian Cultural Center and returned to their home in Orem, Utah. While volunteering here this time, they conducted leadership training for full-time staff and helped with orientation for new PCC employees. He had also previously conducted management training at the Center on eight other occasions. A worldwide trainer  It’s an understatement to say that Elder Theobald is a highly skilled trainer. He graduated from BYU in 1976 with a master’s degree in the...
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Mango Otai: Nectar of the Gods!

  Island breezes, coconut trees, waves lapping on a sandy beach. This must be paradise, yes? But even paradise can get a bit warm, so a special part of any visit to our beautiful island home includes a refreshing drink known locally as Otai. One year ago we shared the traditional Watermelon Otai recipe. This year the Polynesian Cultural Center is excited to share its close relative, Mango Otai, which is both refreshing and delicious! It is a favorite on Oahu, and is sure to be a favorite of yours!       Ingredients   3 fresh mangoes, grated 1...
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Through An Aussie’s Eyes: The Poly...

As much as we like telling the world about visiting the Polynesian Cultural Center, we LOVE it when we can share the experiences of our guests. Here is a great blog by Helena Kreis, an aspiring travel blogger from Australia (http://www.throughanaussieseyes.com). Thanks, Helena! We know your experience will help others looking at coming to our island paradise.     Learning about different cultures is one of the main reasons many of us travel. When we completely immerse ourselves in a culture that is new to us, it opens the doors to a life that we never really...
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PCC pioneer Cy Bridges receives chanter ...

The Moanalua Gardens Foundation, which sponsors the annual Prince Lot Hula Festival, presented widely respected Hawaiian culture expert and Polynesian Cultural Center retiree Cy Bridges with its inaugural Nāmakahelu Oli master chanter’s award at the Iolani Palace bandstand in Honolulu on July 16, 2017, during its 40th anniversary event. The award cited Bridges, who retired from the Center in 2014 after more than 45 years of service, for his “important contributions…as a keeper of our oli [chants] and culture to the preservation of this ancient art form.” As...
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Pani Popo – a Sticky, Gooey, Gotta...

    Pani Popo, or coconut buns, comes from Samoa and is made from yeast bread and sweetened coconut milk. Many people find it tastes more like glazed donuts, and with basic adjustments, such as substituting grapeseed or coconut oil for the butter, you can make a delicious treat that is dairy-free, while using coconut flour will make it gluten free. This is a very easy-to-modify dish, no matter what the dietary restrictions.   There are many recipes out there, but we wanted to present you with an authentic Samoan version where you pour the milk on top just before...
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Visit Laie: New website explores Oahu...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     With the growing strength of the Hawaii tourism market over the past several years and the recent completion of a new hotel here, a hui or organization of businesses and visitor-related activities in-and-around Laie has come together to support a new destination website that consolidates key information for those who may increasingly think of our community as more than a one-day experience. This beautifully illustrated new website is found at: Visitlaie.com     One convenient...
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The Village Approach: Maori child-rearin...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   Maori culture is built upon the premise that…“Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, engari, he toa takitini” (“my achievements are not of myself, but because of the many”.) Māori culture personifies the belief that “it takes a village to raise a child”.  The marae provides a venue for families and extended families to interact in a uniquely Māori environment where children learn their culture. Maoris raise their children together, participate in activities together, build, work and play...