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PCC celebrates 27th annual Moanikeala Hu...

As it has for the past several years, the Polynesian Cultural Center hosted its annual Moanikeala Hula Festival on February 4, 2017, in a perfect setting — under the monkeypod tree in the Hawaiian Village.   PCC’s current kumu hula [or hula master teacher] Pomaika’i Krueger explained, as it has for the past 27 years, this year’s annual festival honors the legacy of the Center’s first kumu, the late Aunty Sally Moanikeala Wood Naluai who taught “many, many students” until she retired in the 1980s. (She remained active, however, as a hula consultant until she passed...
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PART III – Pearl Harbor and WWII H...

SEGMENT III: Mixing It Up In Laie   In Part 3 of our series of Laie during World War II, we learn from the recollections of Laverne Pukahi, Joe Ah Quin and Gladys Pualoa Ahuna about how the locals entertained themselves, what it was like to be surrounded by numerous military camps and we learn about the great tidal wave of 1946.     One Place, Used In Many Different Ways   Things began to calm down in Laie after the first couple of years, though things were never the same. It was the beginning of the big change that effected how everyone worked, played...
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PART II – Pearl Harbor and WWII Hi...

In Part 2 of our series of La’ie during World War II, we learn from the recollections of Laverne Pukahi Joe Ah Quin and Gladys Pualoa Ahuna how martial law, declared immediately following the Japanese attack that brought the US into World War II, affected the local families of Laie.   BACKGROUND: Life In Laie After Pearl Harbor   After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the army anticipated that the Japanese were going to land there in force. American troops took up positions around the perimeter of all the main islands, . They put up barriers on the beaches to deter landings...
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PART I – Pearl Harbor and WWII His...

La’ie In 1941   The town of La’ie sits on the northeast corner of the small Pacific island of Oahu, just a few minutes from the famous beaches of the North Shore.    La’ie was established in ancient times as a pu’uhonua, which means sanctuary, or place of refuge.   Although pu’uhonua were abolished by King Kamehameha in 1819, local residents have always felt that La’ie maintained its spirit of protection and peace.   This came into play in modern times on December 7, 1941 when Japanese aircraft attacked strategic areas of Oahu. Although history...
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A King’s Canoe

  Correcting a Maori waka taua photo caption   Several months ago a woman in New Zealand contacted the PCC to tell us we had mis-identified her great-grandfather in a picture caption of our 60-foot-long 40-man waka taua or war canoe that’s been permanently berthed in the Maori Village for more than 50 years: She wanted to know if we could correct the caption, and what had happened to the canoe . . . which led to the following report.   With input from Cathie Joyce, the great-granddaughter, and our own Seamus Fitzgerald, a former PCC Maori cultural ambassador who’s...
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Hawaiian Slack-key Guitar

    Listen up for slack key in the Hawaiian Village   The popularity of Hawaiian music and instruments such as the steel guitar and ukuleles has spread around the world; and so, rightfully, part of the PCC’s cultural presentation in the village focuses on Hawaiian music broadly; and in a smaller slice of that part, if you’re really lucky, you might get the chance to hear Kaipo Manoa play what the Hawaiians call kī ho’alu — slack-key guitar. He’s really good!   Manoa, our PCC Hawaiian Village “chief” who’s originally from Nanakuli, Oahu, grew up listening to...