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2012 TE MANAHUA JUDGES

All of the judges for the PCC’s 2012 Te Manahua competition came from New Zealand. They are:

Robert Ruha (TMM, BMPA), chief judge, of the Ngati Porou and Ngati Tuwharetoa tribes, was also a judge for the 2004, 2005 and 2006 Whakataetae at the Polynesian Cultural Center. He is the current Co-Tutor of Te Kapa Haka o Te Whanau a Apinui, and national program coordinator in Aotearoa for the Bachelor of Maori Performing Arts Degree through Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi. He is a well-respected kapa haka leader of the Tairawhiti region in New Zealand, a prolific composer and a skilled weaver with extensive kapa haka tutoring experience. As a member of Te Here A Maui performing group from the east coast of New Zealand, Ruha is also a well-known performer on the national stage.

rob-ruha
   

Rowena Dunn (BMPA) is a foundation member of Hatea Kapa Haka, part of its whanau leadership team, and a secondary school teacher currently on sabbatical studying leadership in education. She has performed with Nga Pumanawa (Te Arawa) at the regional level and at the 2000 national whakataetae. As a teacher at Matamata College she organized the roopu to Waikato regionals and also to the 2002 National Secondary Schools whakataetae in Christchurch. Dunn has also led, tutored and organized roopu in Opononi area schools. She is an experienced regional jude, and a regular on the judging panel at Tai Taokerau Junior regionals.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

Joby Hopa (BMPA) grew up in Sydney, Australia, until the family moved to New Zealand when he was 14. After attending Wellesley College a short time he began tutoring kapa haka — leading the school on two occasions at the Auckland Secondary Schools Polyfest. As a member of Te Waka Huia he traveled to Vancouver, Canada, and he also performed with Manu Huia in their 2000 outing at the national whakataetae. More recently he has worked with schools throughout Tai Tokerau and is the fourth-term chairperson of the Waitangi Cultural Trust, the regional kapa haka body for Tai Tokerau. He recently served as the event manager for the 42 roopu in the national secondary schools whakataetae in Whangarei. He leads a weekly waiata session at the Pehiaweri Marae for anyone who wants to learn and sing waiata Maori. Joby is a vital member of the Hatea tutor team and a talented composer. He is also a lecturer with Te Wananga o Aotearoa, running a Maori performing arts program. He is judging with his siblings, Otene and Marcia.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

Marcia Hopa grew up under the tutelage of Muriwai Ihakara in Sydney, Australia, and Ngapo Wehi from Te Waka Huia. When the family moved to New Zealand, she attended Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Maungawhau and went on to Onerahi Primary School and Pompallier Catholic College, where she was part of the kapa haka tutor team. The Hope whanau started Hatea in 2000; she is a kaitataki for the roopu. She is judging with her brothers, Joby and Otene.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

Otene Hopa (BMPA) was born in Sydney, Australia and raised there until age 6. Moving to New Zealand, he was educated at Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Maungawhau until his whanau returned to Whangarei where he attended Pompallier Catholic College and represented Tai Tokerau at Nga Manu Korero on several occasions.
In kapa haka Otene had the opportunity to observe tutors such as Muriwai Ihakara, Ngapo and Pimia Wehi, having grown up in the Te Huinga Waka and Te Waka Huia whanau. Otene and his whanau have been tutoring their own roopu, Hatea, since 2000. He and his brother, Joby, composed most of Hatea’s competition programs. He draws his inspiration from topical events such as the Tuhoe Raids in 2008 and influential people in his life. He is judging with his siblings, Joby and Marcia.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

Anaru Pauline Hopa, who also judged in 2010, is the Kaiarahi (Tutor) of Hatea Kapa Haka with her tamariki — Joby, Otene and Marcia.  They have built up the roopu as an integral part of her marae, Pehiaweri (Ngati Hau). Pauline has performed with several roopu over the years, including Te Huinga Waka (Sydney, Australia) and Te Waka Huia. Born and raised in Whangarei, Pauline attended Kamo High School and gained her first experiences of kapa haka whakataetae at the Tai Tokerau Kapa Haka competition in the 70’s. She is also the Manager – Interventions and Programmes for Corrections – Central Region, and has worked in management positions for the Ministry of Justice and the University of Auckland. She is judging with her tamariki — Otene, Marcia and Joby.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

Priscilla Beach Ruha (TMM, Nat. Dip. MPA) of the Ngati Porou, Ngati Kahungunu, Te Arawa and Ngati Awa Iwi, is a member of Te Kapa Haka o Te Whanau a Apinui — current champions of the Mataatua region who placed third overall in the latest Te Matatini. She previously judged for the PCC's 2004-2006 Whakataetae Festivals. Ruha began performing in national competitions at age 16. Since then she has performed widely in New Zealand as well as internationally and is a former kapa haka teacher for Tihati Productions in Hawaii. She is also known for composing waiata a ringa, haka and poi dances. She recently completed a master’s thesis that presented an indigenous education framework model based on haka. She is judging with her husband, Robert Ruha.

Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   
David Tapene grew up under the tutelage of Ta Kingi Matutaera Ihaka in the Auckland Anglican Maori Club and developed his waiata-tira choral skills as part of the Auckland Anglican roopu, where his mother was a well-known leader. He is currently a supervising tutor with Te Wananga o Aotearoa overseeing the delivery of programs throughout Tai Tokerau. Prior to joining Hatea in Whangarei, he and his wife performed with Te Huinga Waka in Sydney, Australia. David is now part of Hatea’s tutor team and one of the guitarists for the group. During his time with Te Huinga Waka as their choral leader, they achieved several third places and won the waiata tira section of the 1994 Te Matatini. Since then he has led Hatea to second-place waiata tira wins in 2007 and 2011. He is also a member of the Waitangi Cultural committee and recently helped the organizing committee with the National Secondary Schools whakataetae in Whangarei.
Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

2010 TE MANAHUA JUDGES

The 2010 Te Manahua judges:

Donna M. Grant, chief judge (she was also chief judge in the PCC's 2006 Whakataetae), of the Te Arawa, Ngati Toa and Ngati Awa tribes. Grant is frequently called upon to both judge and perform. She has been a kapa haka teacher since 1979 and was selected through national auditions for the 1980 Aotearoa Maori Cultural Group tour of North America and the 1992 World Expo in Seville, Spain. She is the founder and CEO of Manaakitanga Aotearoa Trust Private Training Establishment, based in Rotorua, that aspires to be the "premier facilitator of kapa haka for people of exception." Her PTE works with groups to qualify for the New Zealand National Certificate in Maori Performing Arts.
Donna M. Grant at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   
Anaru Grant, Donna's husband, of the Te Arawa and Tuwharetoa tribes, is a fluent Maori speaker who lives in Hamilton, New Zealand. Grant has previously judged primary and secondary school kapa haka competitions. Like his wife, he was selected through national auditions for the 1980 Aotearoa Maori Cultural Group tour of North America and the 1992 World Expo in Seville, Spain. He currently is co-tutor and leader of the Mai i Maketu ki Tongariro group; and tutors both the Waikato Police and National Police kapa haka groups.
Anaru Grant at Polynesian Cultural Center
Anaru Pauline Hopa - (see the description and photo under the 2012 Judges)
Otene Hopa –(see the description and photo under 2012 Judges)
   

2008 TE MANAHUA JUDGES

The 2008 Te Manahua judges, who are all from New Zealand and came to the Polynesian Cultural Center for the first time, included:

Matiu Tahi, chief judge, of the Tuhoe and Rongowhakaata tribes, lives near Wellington. Tahi — a performer in the Royal New Zealand Navy Combined Forces Kapa Haka as well as other groups, and also a composer and tutor — has previously judged the Tuhoe, Manu Ariki, ASB Secondary and Senior Regional Kapa Haka Competitions in New Zealand. He is currently an advisor to the national kapa haka organization.

judgematiu
   
Paraone Gloyne of the Raukawa tribe, lives in Teawamutu (near Hamilton). He personally got involved in kapa haka as a primary school student, wrote his first waiata or song at age 12 and has since composed over 150 original songs, chants and haka for numerous groups in New Zealand. In addition to his judging at various regional and national secondary school competitions, Gloyne currently acts as tutor, composer and manukura tane or male leader in the Motai-Tangata-Rau group.
judgegloyne
   

Vicky Wehi Kingi of Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Te Whakatohea, Te Whanau-A-Apanui, Ngai Tuhoe and Ngati Kahu descent, lives in the Pakuranga section of Auckland and works as a kapa haka tutor. She began performing at age 3 and has since appeared in 12 senior national Kapa Haka Festivals, held the national kaitataki wahine [female leader] award and was the first-ever recipient of the Pei Te Hurinui Jones national Maori speech competition. Kingi also has 20 years of teaching experience in schools, government institutions and groups throughout New Zealand, including Pounamu and Te Waka Huia.

judgevicky
   

Donna Ross of the Te Rarawa and Ngati Whaatua tribes, comes from Wellington. She began her own involvement in kapa haka at secondary school competitions and has since performed in the senior national competitions numerous times with two different groups, most recently Te Waka Huia. Ross has also co-tutored primary and second school groups since 1990.

judgedonna
   

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2007 Te Whanaketanga judges

Donna M. Grant, chief judge (see her description and photo under 2010 Judges) She also judged in 2006.
   

Anaru Grant,(see his description and photo under 2010 Judges).
He also judged in 2006.

   
Jojo Rangihaeata of the Te Tairawhiti tribe, is a fluent Maori speaker who lives in Gisborne, New Zealand. Rangihaeata is a member of the Whangara Mai Taiwhiti group which won the 2007 national Te Matatini competition, and has performed in the nationals since 1994. She has also previously performed in Japan and Hawaii. Rangihaeata currently tutors in schools and the Te Tohu Paetahi group at Waikato University.
Robert Ruha at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   
Aaron Campbell, J.D., of Kahungunu, Nati Porou, Te Arawa and Tainui descent, moved as a child with his family to Laie, Hawaii. He was tutored in kapa haka by Tommy Taurima and has traveled around the world with the BYU Living Legends group as an ambassador of cultural performing arts. He has been involved in learning mau rakau, the traditional Maori martial art, and loves to perform the haka. Currently he is a consulting attorney for the Kia Ngawari Marae committee based in Utah.
Priscilla Beach at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

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2006 Whakataetae judges

All of the 2006 judges came from New Zealand and are widely recognized for their cultural expertise:

Donna M. Grant, chief judge (see the description and photo above)
   
Paora Sharples of the Ngati Kahunungu and Ngati Porou tribes on the east coast of New Zealand was also a judge at the 2005 Whakataetae. He graduated from Waikato University with a degree in Maori language and is the highest-ranking person in the Maori fighting art of mau taiaha [a martial art using the traditional two-handed club] for Te Whare Tu Taua O Aotearoa or the National School of Maori Weaponry. He's also a prolific performer in New Zealand who has judged at all levels of competition for many years, and has been dancing on the national and international stage for the last 20 years. He's a member of the very well known performing group, Te Roopu Manutake, which he has led on several occasions in the National Maori Performing Arts Finals. His father, Dr. Peter Sharples, is currently the head of the Maori Party, a political party in New Zealand.
Paora Sharples at Polynesian Cultural Center
   
Robert Ruha (see his description and photo under 2012 Judges). He also judged in 2004-2005.
   
Priscilla Beach (see her description listed as Priscilla Beach Ruha and photo under 2012 Judges).
   
Delamere Rei of the Te Arawa and Ngati tribes has been a judge at the secondary school, regional and national level for over 20 years in both New Zealand and Australia. She was raised at Whakarewarewa in Rotorua, has been performing kapa haka since she was 4, and is an exponent of the poi. In 1970 she was selected, along with her husband, to tour the world with the National Theatre Trust Culture Group. Rei currently lives and works in Rotorua as a Maori teacher at the Rotorua Girls High School.
Delamere Rei at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   
Kiriwaitingi Rei of the Te Arawa, Ngati Toa and Ngati Awa tribes has been a performer at the regional and national levels in New Zealand, appearing with the Rotorua-based group, Ngati Rangiwewehi in the 1996, 1998 and 2000 National Maori Performing Arts Festivals. At the most recent national competition, held in Palmerston North in 2005, Kiri performed with Te Waka Huia. She lives in Rotorua and is a solicitor specializing in family law and general litigation. She is married with twin sons.
Rei at the Polynesian Cultural Center
   

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2005 Whakataetae judges

All of the 2005 judges came from New Zealand and are widely recognized there for their cultural expertise. They include:

Paora Sharples, chief judge (see his description and photo under 2006 Judges)  
   
Robert Ruha(see his description and photo under 2012 Judges). He also judged in 2004 and 2006.  
   
Priscilla Beach (see her description and photo listed as Priscilla Beach Ruha under 2012 Judges). She also judged in 2006.  
   
Kiri Horua of the Ngati Porou and Ngai Tamanuhiri tribes, is another Te Here A Maui member who is a widely known performer and tutor in New Zealand with years of experience. She holds a diploma in Maori performing arts, is a skilled choreographer specializing in poi and waiata ringa. In 2002 she was the youngest tutor to take a group to participate in the Aotearoa Traditional Maori Performing Arts Festival. Horua is currently the kapa haka tutor for the Gisborne Girls and Boys High Schools, and also teaches Maori performing arts at the Gisborne Girls school in Gisborne, New Zealand. Kiri Horua
   
Kim Makekau, originally from Maui, Hawaii, is a former Polynesian Cultural Center Maori cultural lead. He's a ngakau (heart) member of the highest level in Te Whare Tu Taua o Aotearoa, the same school that Paora Sharples is in. Makekau is also well known for his own Maori fighting arts school, has taught Maori performing arts at various levels since he left Laie over the last 15 years, has been running his own Maori education programs, and more recently has also been teaching Maori language. Kim Makekau
   
Rahira Makekau, Kim's wife, is of the Ngai Tuhoe tribe of Te Arawa. She has been around kapa haka her whole life and is an original performer and tutor for Pounamu, which specializes in Maori cultural performances and tours both within New Zealand and abroad. Rahira is also an original member of of Te Waka Huia, one of the top performing groups in New Zealand, which has won back-to-back kapa haka championships. She currently tutors kapa haka in Tokoroa, New Zealand. Rahira Makekau

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Kala mai (sorry), the Polynesian Cultural Center did not keep records or photos of
earlier event judges.
pauline hopa