delete

The Elephant Shack brings food to ‘Thai’...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The Elephant Shack food truck, which has been a favorite on the North Shore for years, is already drawing repeat customers among Thai food fans! The newest addition to the Polynesian Cultural Center’s Hukilau Marketplace moved its service to La’ie October 16, 2018.   A harmonious blend of flavorful food     The range of Thai food is known around the world for its harmonious blend of fresh vegetables, herbs, moderate amounts of shredded or chopped meat, coconut cream...
delete

Pan Roasted Turkey Tails – Slow co...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The secret to this simple approach is patience. Cook it long and slow, which will make it both extremely tender and delightfully crispy   Bringing you a tasty new recipe of an old favorite!   I discovered this little turkey tail delicacy back when I was a little gal oh so many years ago and from that day on, I would beg, borrow or cry a river of tears to be the one who got this part of the bird on Thanksgiving Day. The turkey has a long, rich history not only in the...
delete

Polynesian Cultural Center co-sponsors i...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   For centuries the people of Polynesia have recognized the importance of breadfruit — called ‘ulu in Hawaiian and Samoan — as a source of food, lumber, and other materials. History and movie fans may remember Captain Bligh and HMS Bounty sailed to Tahiti in the late 1700s to retrieve breadfruit saplings and replant them in the Caribbean. Of course, that particular voyage ended in an infamous mutiny, but today breadfruit is widely used in tropical countries around the world — in more ways...
delete

David Hannemann remembered as a legacy o...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       For this month’s article, we would like to recognize a true champion to the Polynesian Cultural Center, Tausilinu’u David Hannemann, who passed away on October 9th at the age of 92. Uncle David has been our friend, our adviser, and our spiritual example for so many years. Tausilinu’u David Hannemann (fondly known as Uncle David) was born in Apia, Samoa in 1926. After immigrating to the US in 1946, and marrying his sweetheart, Carolyn Harline, David was invited to become the...
delete

10 tips for your adventure at the Polyne...

    1. Prepare for rain     Bring a rain parka or umbrella (or purchase one at one of our many stores). We are on the windward side of the island and can have showers on the sunniest of days. It’s what makes us clean and green! Rain can last a handful of minutes or throughout the day. Our luau and evening show venues are covered, so you won’t get rained out, ever!     2. Easily plan your day with PCC’s app     Download our app for an easy-to-follow GPS map, a schedule of presentations, cultural insights, and so much more. Free...
delete

How To Make Spam Musubi Like They Do In ...

  Spam, that strange meat loaf from a can, has become so popular in Hawaii that they actually keep it in locked shelving at the grocery store. It is no surprise that the beloved meat has found its way to the top of a musubi. Musubi comes from the Japanese rice ball snack omusubi and was created and popularized by a local Japanese woman, Barbara Funamura. Try this easy-to-follow, fun-to-make recipe provided by our own Rebecca Sabalones to see what all the excitement is about.     Spam Musubi (Makes 8-10 servings) Cooking time: 40 min   Ingredients: 2...
delete

How To Make Coconut Oil And Why Fijians ...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     “The [coconut] oil is something we still use until today in different parts of Fiji for a lot of things in our culture — cooking, body lotion, medicine and healing wounds among them. For example, our people mixed it with charcoal and used it to help tattooing heal faster,” said Kalivati Volavola, the Fijian cultural ambassador for the Polynesian Cultural Center. Volavola, who is from Nabitu in the Tailevu district of Viti Levu, Fiji’s main island, first came to Laie in 2007 to attend...
delete

“Huki” costumes take a year-...

  Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       Pictured above: The final versions of three Huki costume designs Roger Ewens created after consulting extensively with PCC cultural specialists and other members of the Huki committee: (left-right) a 1940s-era Hawaiian hula outfit (with ti-leaf skirt). An unusual blue Fijian finalé outfit, and a more “organic” look for a historical Tongan king costume.   Since the Polynesian Cultural Center staged the grand premiere of Huki: One ‘ohana sharing aloha on August 18, 2018,...