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Chinese Tea Cookies and the Laie Connect...

    People from the Laie area love and adore a certain cookie available at our local Sam’s Store which is next to the famous Hukilau Cafe.  Here, and only here, they are referred to as Pake (pa-kay) Cake.  Anywhere else, they are called Chinese Tea Cookies.  “Pake” ” is a Hawaiian translation of the word “Chinese” or “China”.  In Laie, we like nicknames, and the shorter the better! A little bit about Sam’s Store.  The original owner was Sam Choy. It has changed hands a few times, but it’s still a quaint, hometown store tucked well into a...
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Christmas in Polynesia: Mele and Iosepa

    Episode #7   Sending You Our Holiday Greetings!     Episode #6   “SILENT NIGHT” A Tender Moment of Christmas Love and Joy with Mele and Iosepa Marau na Kerisimasi!  (Merry Christmas – Fiji)       Episode #5 “Mele Lets Out Her Inner Diva…” Iosepa holds his aching ears while the chicken clears the beach.   Episode #4 “Iosepa Receives the Present of Mele’s…uhm… His Dreams” …and is overcome with great joy! Episode #3 “Iosepa Wraps Up More Than Just the Presents”  Mele stumbles...
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PCC News and Updates 12-14

Our New Hukilau Marketplace undergoes soft opening   Part of the Polynesian Cultural Center’s new Hukilau Marketplace underwent a “soft opening” on December 10, 2014.   More specifically:     Goo’s Plantation Store, “which is a throw-back to Goo’s Old Plantation Store, that was a mainstay of the Laie community for many years. That store will be offering souvenirs, PCC logo wear and guest comfort lines,” says Kealii Haverly, PCC Director of In-Center Marketing.      Hapa Home Store, a home accent store that carries “things to brighten homes and apartments,...
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Favorites in Tahiti

  Surprise!  Our Tahitian Village guests love eating free samples  Heitiare Pane’e, our PCC Tahitian Village “chiefess” or manager, reports that sampling faraoa opa’a or traditional Tahitian coconut bread is one of the favorite guest activities in the village. “We explain to them how it’s made from shredded coconut and cooked in the ahi ma’a or underground oven,” she says. “Then we pass out tasty, free samples.” Don’t you wish you could try some, too? So, what do you think is the second-most favorite thing to watch, or even try, if you dare, in the...
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Tahiti E! Ia Orana!

    By Polynesian Cultural Blogger Bobby Akoi, Jr.    Have you ever been to a Polynesian show and watched as the female dancers moved their hips in circles at a crazy fast speed? Do you want to know how they do it?  It’s actually very simple, but it takes a lot of practice.  This Tahitian Dance is called ‘Tamure’. Now I don’t profess to be a ra’atira pupu (leader/teacher of a Tahitian group).  However, I’ve been around Tahitian dancing long enough to understand its dance moves. Having two daughters growing up and dancing Tahitian at the...