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Kalua Pig, Hawaiian Style in Your Own Ki...

       Email Sign Up       Story by Polynesian Cultural Blogger, Bobby Akoi, Jr     I grew up in a Hawaiian homestead community of Keaukaha on the the Big Island of Hawai’i.  One tradition that I loved participating in as a kid was putting a pig underground.   Kalua is a traditional Hawaiian cooking method that utilizes an imu, or an underground oven.    Our other Polynesian neighbors use the same method with different variations.   With the leadership of Uncles Luka Kanakaole, George Kahoilua, & John Manuia, as young boys we were ready to help.  The...
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Hukilau Marketplace is OPEN!

    By the time you receive our PCC February eNewsletter, our new Hukilau Marketplace should be ready for its grand opening, now tentatively set for February 20. Of course, we’ll cover that event for you; but meanwhile, here is a recent aerial photo of construction progress on both the marketplace …as well as the new Laie Courtyard by Marriott Hotel, which is scheduled to open in mid-summer 2015 (photos by senior volunteer Jack Baxter): …with the PCC’s Samoan Village on the left, the site of the new Laie McDonald’s in the upper center, and Laie Point...
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Cultural Ambassador, Fasi Tovo “Gr...

    Tongan Cultural Ambassador “Graduates” from the Polynesian Cultural Center   Former Tongan Village manager and Theater dance instructor Fakasiieiki “Fasi” Tovo, one of the Polynesian Cultural Center’s most senior employees, retired at the end of December 2014 after working here for the past 45 years. Family, friends and other PCC villagers honored him at a special “graduation” party on December 26. Tovo, who is originally from Tonga, came to Laie in 1970 to attend BYU-Hawaii; and like many students then and since, he soon began working at the Polynesian...
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Honoring Hula in the Hawaiian Village

    Honoring our hula heritage:   Next to aloha and Hawaii, perhaps no other Hawaiian word conjures more imagery of our beautiful islands and friendly people than hula. Kaipo Manoa, our Hawaiian Village manager or “chief,” explains more about our popular dance form. “For many centuries past, our ancient dance form which we call hula kahiko, was learned and practiced almost entirely by men,” he said. “We continue to enjoy hula kahiko, which today is performed by both men and women, and is accompanied by drums, other Hawaiian percussion instruments, chants and...