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Eat Polynesia! Lilikoi Cake

    The Lilikoi or passion fruit is a favorite in the islands with its sweet/tart flavor and versatility. From cakes to marinades there is always room for a little lilikoi.   There are several varieties of passion fruit with colors ranging from red to purple to yellow. The lilikoi that grows in most backyards in Hawaii is yellow when ripe.   Lilikoi is a fast-growing, strong vine that is a perfect complement to your back fence.   Harvest time? Easy, just wait until the fruit drops on the ground, then pick it up! Regardless of the color on the...
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2015 March Updates

    PCC updates: Hukilau Marketplace opening    Hukilau Marketplace Grand Opening   The official opening of our exciting new Hukilau Marketplace on February 20, 2015, was another great Polynesian Cultural Center event. Hundreds of people from the community got the opportunity to explore this major new addition to the PCC, enjoyed free food, mini-concert music by Vaihi — who are all PCC alumni — and Mana’o Company, and a special “street battle” fireknife event. But it was the presence of dozens of kūpuna, our Hawaiian elders, and their family members who came to...
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Pounders Restaurant Pizza and More!

    Spoiler alert: Pounders pizza may wreck you from enjoying any others   The next time you’re in Laie, home of the Polynesian Cultural Center, and you’re feeling ono (hungry), you’ve gotta’ try one of our new Pounders Restaurant 10-inch Hawaiian pizzas in the Hukilau Marketplace: They’re “to die for” delicious.   In fact, you may not be able to stop at one, especially if you’re sharing. First off, guests can choose from 10 different Neopolitan-style pizzas, but be ready, none of these are like your usual neighborhood choices:   Pounders Restaurant Four Cheeses...
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Maoritanga — The Maori Way of Life

    Māoritanga — Māori culture — is very much alive   Occasionally, a travel writer may describe the Polynesian Cultural Center as a “living museum”: That is, a place where we’ve recreated the past, but that’s not really accurate. Granted, most Polynesians now-a-days live in modern housing and dress in current fashions, whereas all of our PCC village houses are traditional and many of our villagers wear more traditional clothing; but even in this regard, most of our village staff dress traditionally. In the Samoan or Fijian villages, for example, will see...
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Celebrating “Fakapale” Style

       Email Sign Up     Tongans, along with the rest of our Polynesians, love to dance. It is in their blood and sometimes in their wallets. Let me explain!       I’ve learned in all my years working at the Polynesian Cultural Center that when you attend a Tongan celebration, festival, or party, you should always bring some dollar bills with you. It took me a couple of times to really get it. But it didn’t take too long to realize that I must save face and be sure to have $1 bills in my pocket before attending any Tongan function.     It is usual for...
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Eat Polynesia! Lomi Lomi Salmon

    Sometime in the first half of the 19th century Lomi Lomi Salmon became a Hawaiian staple. No one knows for sure how a dish made almost entirely of non-native ingredients came to be but the Hawaiian Time Machine Blog has one of the best explanations I’ve seen.               Ingredient mystery aside, Lomi Lomi Salmon has become an integral part of local Hawaiian cuisine. Lomi Lomi means to massage and that’s one of the secrets to a successful dish. There are only 4 basic ingredients and the instructions are deceptively...