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Loko’i’a: Hawaiian Aquacultu...

  Ever wanted to catch fish without actually fishing? Hawaiians created an ingenious way to farm fish in their natural habitat by building an enclosed section of ocean.  There they raised fish, somewhat like raising animals on a farm. Loko’i’a or fishponds were made by building a large stone wall with a gate.   Smaller fish were able to swim in to feed, protected from larger predators which were too big to fit through the gate.  Soon the smaller fish had grown too large to exit through the gate. It was then the simple task of lawai’a or fishermen to...
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PCC Pineapple Cookie Bars

There is a new Facebook group by the name of “I Love BYUH!”  As of May of 2016, there are approximately 14,000 members – alumni and current or former employees of Brigham Young University – Hawaii, in the beautiful little town of La’ie, Oahu, Hawaii. It’s a great group of people sharing memories and life events, asking fun questions, posting old pictures and reconnecting with dear friends.   Members started asking for recipes of some of their favorite dishes from the spectacular Polynesian Cultural Center, which most of the students have worked at while attending college...
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Pulefano Galea’i: The History of P...

  (photos and story by Mike Foley)   As the Polynesian Cultural Center prepares to celebrate its 24th annual Samoan World Fireknife Championship and We Are Samoa Festival on May 12-14, 2016, we turn to PCC retiree and High Talking Chief (an aloali’i of Manu’a) Galea’i “Pule” Pulefano for his historical insights on both the PCC’s special event and cultural origins of the popular ‘ailao afi’ or Samoan fire knife dance.   Note: In Samoan, the dance is called ‘ailao afi and the knife is a nifo oti or “deadly tooth.” Galea’i also holds his mother’s maternal family...
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PCC News – May 2016

  Corrections to the PCC Maori Waka Taua story:   Please note: An earlier version of this story contained several incorrect facts and/or repeated several questionable “myths.” We replaced it with a more accurate history of the PCC’s Maori waka taua story, by CLICKING HERE.   In the early days of the PCC, Maori villagers actually launched the waka on the Center’s freshwater lagoon; but it was long ago put on display under its own canoe hut. It has been refurbished several times over the decades since, and it is currently underdoing another major renovation. CLICK HERE...
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How To Build Two Gigantic Tikis

  Fun Fact: Tiki is a Maori word; ki’i is the Hawaiian equivalent, but we’ll stick with the Maori version because it’s so prevalent. Also, the plural form of Polynesian nouns in their respective languages is not made by adding S — some writers won’t even add an S when the Polynesian word is used in English, but we will utilize them for the comfort of our mainland readers:     As guests stroll from the Polynesian Cultural Center’s new Hukilau Marketplace into the village area, they now pass through an impressive gateway arch that is over 30 feet tall, set-off by the...