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In a Word: Ohana means family

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   In a Word: Ohana = Family Valentines Day is upon us, and here in Hawaii, nothing reflects love more than OHANA   An integral part of Hawaiian culture is the care and nurturing of family, or ohana. From ancient times to the present Hawaiians embrace the opportunity of living in the company of aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents and yes, even the in-laws. In communities of old, every member of the ohana was expected to contribute to the tasks of daily life.   Even keiki (children) honed...
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Bure Kalou, the Fijian Spirit House

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     “bure kalou”  A Fijian house of worship, or temple from pre-Christian times     This full-scale replica in the Fiji Village at The Polynesian Culture Center on the island of Oahu, Hawaii is the only bure kalou outside of Fiji. Throughout Polynesia, places of worship were crafted on layered platforms, some with pyramids. Fiji is the only culture to place a 6 story building on a platform. They believed that the taller the place of worship, the closer the people would be to their...
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A master’s touch: Restoring the tr...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The following blog was taken from an in-depth interview with Master Carver and Polynesian Navigator, Kawika Eskaran of Laie, Hawaii, who along with Sione Tuione Pulotu, guided the design and construction of the Iosepa, a 57′ double hulled sailing canoe modeled in style and function after the ancient canoes utilized by Hawaiians to travel the seas. The Iosepa was sponsored and built through a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University – Hawaii and The Polynesian...
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Steel guitar originates and lives on in ...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     The steel guitar legacy begins in Laie The Polynesian Cultural Center has a unique connection to the Hawaiian steel guitar: Its inventor was born in Laie, home of the PCC, in 1874. Young Joseph Kekukuupenaokamehamehakanaiaupuni Apuakehau, who shortened his stage name to Kekuku, invented the steel guitar in 1885. It is sometimes said he laid a guitar across his lap and moved the back of metal comb across the frets to create the first distinctive Hawaiian steel guitar sounds. Almost 140...
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The Village Approach: Maori child-rearin...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   Maori culture is built upon the premise that…“Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, engari, he toa takitini” (“my achievements are not of myself, but because of the many”.) Māori culture personifies the belief that “it takes a village to raise a child”.  The marae provides a venue for families and extended families to interact in a uniquely Māori environment where children learn their culture. Maoris raise their children together, participate in activities together, build, work and play...
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Polynesian Cultural Center pioneer: Pato...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   With all the attention recently focused on Cook Islanders currently appearing for six weeks at the Polynesian Cultural Center, it seems fitting that we introduce you to Patoa Benioni. The first Cook Islander at the PCC More than 50 years ago, Patoa — who was born in Aitutaki in 1941 but spent most of his boyhood on Rarotonga in the Cook Islands — played a key role as an original Polynesian Cultural Center performer. Today, almost everybody calls him Patoa or Uncle Patoa, but like some...