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Cook Islands return to the Polynesian Cu...

  Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up         The Polynesian Cultural Center is pleased to announce that we will be hosting our friends from the Cook Islands again this summer from June 18 – July 19, 2018. “We were greatly honored last summer to host cultural representatives from the Cook Islands,” stated P. Alfred Grace, President of the Polynesian Cultural Center. “We couldn’t be more pleased that their government has approved a return visit. Their rich culture, music and dance are...
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Huilua Fishpond in Kahana Bay: Explore t...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up         The Huilua Fishpond, is an authentic example of ancient Hawaiian aquaculture. You will find the loko i’a (fishpond in Hawaiian) as you approach the south side of Kahana Bay. The parking just off the highway consists of just a handful of spaces. You will need to take a short walk to get to the ponds, but the effort will be well worth your time.   The pond is not currently in working condition but parts of the wall are still standing, like an ancient jigsaw puzzle left by...
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Hui Ho’oulu Aloha: PCC revives hula hala...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   When Hui Ho’oulu Aloha performed in the recent 28th annual Moanikeala Hula Festival on February 3, 2018, it was the first time in more than 20 years that the Polynesian Cultural Center’s own hula halau [school] had appeared in public. [Grammatical note: In English, we say hula halau; in Hawaiian, it’s halau hula.] PCC cultural performance specialist and kumu hula [hula teacher or master] Pomaika’i Krueger pointed out the historic origins of Hui Ho’oulu Aloha when he introduced the halau during...
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In a Word: Ohana means family

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   In a Word: Ohana = Family Valentines Day is upon us, and here in Hawaii, nothing reflects love more than OHANA   An integral part of Hawaiian culture is the care and nurturing of family, or ohana. From ancient times to the present Hawaiians embrace the opportunity of living in the company of aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents and yes, even the in-laws. In communities of old, every member of the ohana was expected to contribute to the tasks of daily life.   Even keiki (children) honed...
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Bure Kalou, the Fijian Spirit House

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     “bure kalou”  A Fijian house of worship, or temple from pre-Christian times     This full-scale replica in the Fiji Village at The Polynesian Culture Center on the island of Oahu, Hawaii is the only bure kalou outside of Fiji. Throughout Polynesia, places of worship were crafted on layered platforms, some with pyramids. Fiji is the only culture to place a 6 story building on a platform. They believed that the taller the place of worship, the closer the people would be to their...
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A master’s touch: Restoring the tr...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The following blog was taken from an in-depth interview with Master Carver and Polynesian Navigator, Kawika Eskaran of Laie, Hawaii, who along with Sione Tuione Pulotu, guided the design and construction of the Iosepa, a 57′ double hulled sailing canoe modeled in style and function after the ancient canoes utilized by Hawaiians to travel the seas. The Iosepa was sponsored and built through a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University – Hawaii and The Polynesian...