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Tongan proverbs shows family devotion

  Throughout history people all over the world have used proverbs — a general statement of truth or advice drawn from observations of surroundings or actions. For example, one of the best-known English-language proverbs, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” means images usually help a person understand emotions and/or messages better than written or spoken explanations. Well, it turns out Polynesians also particularly love proverbs using their own respective languages and references. Here are two examples you might find interesting: Tonga: ‘The almond tree and the...
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The Polynesian Cultural Center’s most sy...

  The Maori whare tupuna or ancestral meeting house that dominates the Aotearoa Village is perhaps the most symbolic structure in the entire Polynesian Cultural Center. ‘These buildings memorialize great leaders’ Kim Makekau, Aotearoa Village manager, recently explained several key points he hopes all Polynesian Cultural Center visitors learn about the whare tupuna: ■ “Each ancestral meeting house, in the main, is named after a significant common ancestor of that particular tribal area. That’s where you want to start from. These buildings memorialize great leaders....
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Hawai’i students keep Samoan tradi...

    ‘We Are Samoa’  Hundreds of Hawai’i high school students practiced for months to learn traditional Samoan customs, songs, dances and household chores so they could share them with several thousand parents and fans on Saturday, May 11, 2019, during the Polynesian Cultural Center’s 27th annual We Are Samoa festival. The festival is held each year in conjunction with the PCC’s World Fireknife Championships, which has its own tradition of being a don’t-miss event. As in years past, the entire Pacific Theater was sold out. Many more people from...
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Powerful Polynesian symbolism you can se...

  Polynesians use symbols to represent ideas, emotions, states of mind, phrases, movements, memories, loved ones and much more. The symbols can be embodied in words, names, carvings, lei, designs, dance, music, and so on. Hawaiians say many such representations have kaona, expressions with deeper meanings, concealed references or inuendos. The kaona might be beautiful or romantic, others sarcastic or pejorative. Many might appreciate an island song for its surface meaning, not realizing those who understand the kaona get a different meaning from the metaphorical...
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Doug Christy Carries on Father’s Wood Ca...

      Doug Christy, a Maori carver at the Polynesian Cultural Center for the past 37 years, is continuing the legacy of his father, the late Epanaia Whaanga Christy. The senior Christy, or “Uncle Barney”, worked at the Center until just a few months before he passed away at age 83 in 2004. Master carver ‘Uncle Barney’ Christy Uncle Barney was already a skilled carver in New Zealand in the early 1960s when he joined the team that created the original carvings for the PCC’s Maori Village. Doug, who was born about that time in Hamilton,...
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Women now have their own division at the...

      Exciting addition to 2019 World Fireknife Championship “Soon after the Polynesian Cultural Center’s 2018 World Fireknife Championship competition ended last May, we began preparing to make the 27th annual competition from May 8-11, 2019, even better,” said Delsa Atoa Moe, PCC Vice President of Cultural Presentations. Moe explained she and her committee decided to reinstate a women’s open division (for ages 18-and-up). “Women have been competing regularly over the past 26 years,” she said. “For example, Jeralee...