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Powerful Polynesian symbolism you can se...

  Polynesians use symbols to represent ideas, emotions, states of mind, phrases, movements, memories, loved ones and much more. The symbols can be embodied in words, names, carvings, lei, designs, dance, music, and so on. Hawaiians say many such representations have kaona, expressions with deeper meanings, concealed references or inuendos. The kaona might be beautiful or romantic, others sarcastic or pejorative. Many might appreciate an island song for its surface meaning, not realizing those who understand the kaona get a different meaning from the metaphorical...
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Doug Christy carries on father’s wood ca...

      Doug Christy, a Maori carver at the Polynesian Cultural Center for the past 37 years, is continuing the legacy of his father, the late Epanaia Whaanga Christy. The senior Christy, or “Uncle Barney”, worked at the Center until just a few months before he passed away at age 83 in 2004. Master carver ‘Uncle Barney’ Christy Uncle Barney was already a skilled carver in New Zealand in the early 1960s when he joined the team that created the original carvings for the PCC’s Maori Village. Doug, who was born about that time in Hamilton,...
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Women now have their own division at the...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       Exciting addition to 2019 World Fireknife Championship “Soon after the Polynesian Cultural Center’s 2018 World Fireknife Championship competition ended last May, we began preparing to make the 27th annual competition from May 8-11, 2019, even better,” said Delsa Atoa Moe, PCC Vice President of Cultural Presentations. Moe explained she and her committee decided to reinstate a women’s open division (for ages 18-and-up). “Women have been competing...
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Cook Islands return to the Polynesian Cu...

  Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up         The Polynesian Cultural Center is pleased to announce that we will be hosting our friends from the Cook Islands again this summer from June 18 – July 19, 2018. “We were greatly honored last summer to host cultural representatives from the Cook Islands,” stated P. Alfred Grace, President of the Polynesian Cultural Center. “We couldn’t be more pleased that their government has approved a return visit. Their rich culture, music and dance are...
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Huilua Fishpond in Kahana Bay: Explore t...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up         The Huilua Fishpond, is an authentic example of ancient Hawaiian aquaculture. You will find the loko i’a (fishpond in Hawaiian) as you approach the south side of Kahana Bay. The parking just off the highway consists of just a handful of spaces. You will need to take a short walk to get to the ponds, but the effort will be well worth your time.   The pond is not currently in working condition but parts of the wall are still standing, like an ancient jigsaw puzzle left by...
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Hui Ho’oulu Aloha: PCC revives hula hala...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   When Hui Ho’oulu Aloha performed in the recent 28th annual Moanikeala Hula Festival on February 3, 2018, it was the first time in more than 20 years that the Polynesian Cultural Center’s own hula halau [school] had appeared in public. [Grammatical note: In English, we say hula halau; in Hawaiian, it’s halau hula.] PCC cultural performance specialist and kumu hula [hula teacher or master] Pomaika’i Krueger pointed out the historic origins of Hui Ho’oulu Aloha when he introduced the halau during...