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PCC celebrates 27th annual Moanikeala Hu...

As it has for the past several years, the Polynesian Cultural Center hosted its annual Moanikeala Hula Festival on February 4, 2017, in a perfect setting — under the monkeypod tree in the Hawaiian Village.   PCC’s current kumu hula [or hula master teacher] Pomaika’i Krueger explained, as it has for the past 27 years, this year’s annual festival honors the legacy of the Center’s first kumu, the late Aunty Sally Moanikeala Wood Naluai who taught “many, many students” until she retired in the 1980s. (She remained active, however, as a hula consultant until she passed...
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Hawaii Village at the PCC displays nativ...

The Hawaiian Islands are an archipelago of 8 major islands and multiple small outcroppings. They are considered the most isolated land mass on earth. Very few native plants have survived the invasion of foreign ornamental and crop vegetation.      The Hawaii Village at the Polynesian Cultural Center is honored to tend and present Hawaiian based plants. Here is an overview of just a few:   MEDICINAL PLANTS   Growing alongside the Hale Hana (Work House) is a bush that hosts small purple flowers.  This plant, called the Awōwī, is utilized as a poultice for mending...
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Polynesian Cultural Center tips: How to ...

    How to remove coconut “meat” from the shell   Millions of people have enjoyed the coconut demonstrations in the Polynesian Cultural Center’s Samoan Village. The young men — who do all the cooking, you may remember — make it look so easy; but once you’re back home and you’re tempted to buy a coconut from the supermarket, have you ever wondered…   Q: Is there an easy way to crack a coconut and get the “meat” out?   A: Yes there is, and no hammers, chisels, drills, saws, screwdrivers, nails, or vices, etc., are required. In fact, it’s kind of easy....
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Do Hula Dancers Still Use “Grass Skirts”...

Grass Skirts, or Not?   So-called “grass skirts” have always been a misnomer; however, Hawaiians and other Polynesians have traditionally used strips of natural fibers, barks and other materials to create various skirts and adornment. The purpose of such skirts, beyond decoration, was — and is — always to accentuate the dancer’s movements.     For example, strips of the inner wild hibiscus bark — which Hawaiians and Tahitians call hau, and Samoans and Tongans call fau — are still collected today, cleaned and bleached in salt water, dried and then strung together...
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Tongan Funerals and Weddings: Strength a...

  As explained on the official website of the Kingdom of Tonga….”family is the central unit of Tongan life.”   “Tongan society is guided by four core values, all of which combine to ensure a generous and genuine welcome to visitors to the Kingdom; Fefaka’apa’apa’aki (mutual respect), Feveitokai’aki (sharing, cooperating and fulfilment of mutual obligations), Lototoo (humility and generosity), and Tauhi vaha’a (loyalty and commitment). Older persons command the most respect and each family member knows their role. A typical family unit may...
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Fijians Share Several Unique Cultural As...

During a recent retirement farewell event for former Hawaiian cultural specialist Keith Awai (CLICK HERE to view video from this great celebration), PCC Fijian Village “chief” Ratu Seru Inoke Suguturaga noted the while Polynesians share many similar cultural aspects among the various island groups, there were at least three things that were unique to only the Fijians and Hawaiians:   Fijian derua and Hawaiian ka’eke’eke or bamboo percussion tube  instruments:   Suguturaga explained both Fijians and Hawaiians use varying lengths of thin-walled bamboo, with all but the...