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Huilua Fishpond in Kahana Bay: Explore t...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up         The Huilua Fishpond, is an authentic example of ancient Hawaiian aquaculture. You will find the loko i’a (fishpond in Hawaiian) as you approach the south side of Kahana Bay. The parking just off the highway consists of just a handful of spaces. You will need to take a short walk to get to the ponds, but the effort will be well worth your time.   The pond is not currently in working condition but parts of the wall are still standing, like an ancient jigsaw puzzle left by...
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Antique pump organ still plays on at the...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     The Polynesian Cultural Center is the proud owner of an 1890 Estey Pump Organ, called a parlor organ. It is about 7.5 feet tall. Isn’t it magnificent? For many years Estey produced more pump organs in the USA than any other manufacturer in its day. This organ was donated and placed here when the Mission Chapel was built in 1984. Although lovingly cared for, it has experienced long periods of disrepair due to humidity, heat, bugs and mice.   The latest refurbish took almost a year to...
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Hui Ho’oulu Aloha: PCC revives hula hala...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   When Hui Ho’oulu Aloha performed in the recent 28th annual Moanikeala Hula Festival on February 3, 2018, it was the first time in more than 20 years that the Polynesian Cultural Center’s own hula halau [school] had appeared in public. [Grammatical note: In English, we say hula halau; in Hawaiian, it’s halau hula.] PCC cultural performance specialist and kumu hula [hula teacher or master] Pomaika’i Krueger pointed out the historic origins of Hui Ho’oulu Aloha when he introduced the halau during...
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A master’s touch: Restoring the tr...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The following blog was taken from an in-depth interview with Master Carver and Polynesian Navigator, Kawika Eskaran of Laie, Hawaii, who along with Sione Tuione Pulotu, guided the design and construction of the Iosepa, a 57′ double hulled sailing canoe modeled in style and function after the ancient canoes utilized by Hawaiians to travel the seas. The Iosepa was sponsored and built through a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University – Hawaii and The Polynesian...
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Steel guitar originates and lives on in ...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up     The steel guitar legacy begins in Laie The Polynesian Cultural Center has a unique connection to the Hawaiian steel guitar: Its inventor was born in Laie, home of the PCC, in 1874. Young Joseph Kekukuupenaokamehamehakanaiaupuni Apuakehau, who shortened his stage name to Kekuku, invented the steel guitar in 1885. It is sometimes said he laid a guitar across his lap and moved the back of metal comb across the frets to create the first distinctive Hawaiian steel guitar sounds. Almost 140...
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PCC pioneer Cy Bridges receives chanter ...

The Moanalua Gardens Foundation, which sponsors the annual Prince Lot Hula Festival, presented widely respected Hawaiian culture expert and Polynesian Cultural Center retiree Cy Bridges with its inaugural Nāmakahelu Oli master chanter’s award at the Iolani Palace bandstand in Honolulu on July 16, 2017, during its 40th anniversary event. The award cited Bridges, who retired from the Center in 2014 after more than 45 years of service, for his “important contributions…as a keeper of our oli [chants] and culture to the preservation of this ancient art form.” As...