delete

2019 Moanikeala Hula Festival – a ...

  People all over the world love Hawaiian hula dancing, and serious hula dancers have much respect for their kumu (teachers). Haumana or students join halau (schools) based on the styles, traditions and reputation of the kumu. In Hawaii, it’s common for some haumana to remain in the same halau for years, ranging from keiki (children) to kupuna (elders). Hula knowledge is traditionally passed down over years of rigorous training and performances. Kumu learned the same way from their kumu— who might be someone in their own family lines. Even if not, kumu often trace...
delete

Choosing an ukulele? Here’s what y...

The ukulele store at the Polynesian Cultural Center welcomes all to learn and play the ukulele and finds many people seeking advice on choosing their ukulele.  For those of you who can’t come, we would be glad to give you advice for our most common questions. We’ve pointed out some key information to consider here: Wood Koa is the highest-end wood that comes from Hawaii. It is beautiful to look at and listen to. A lot of value is put into the grade of the koa wood, which is determined by how close to the bottom of the tree you are. The wood that is closer to the bottom of...
delete

Hawaiian Steel Guitar History

The steel guitar legacy begins in Laie The Polynesian Cultural Center has a unique connection to the Hawaiian steel guitar: Its inventor was born in Laie, home of the PCC, in 1874. Young Joseph Kekukuupenaokamehamehakanaiaupuni Apuakehau, who shortened his stage name to Kekuku, invented the steel guitar in 1885. It is sometimes said he laid a guitar across his lap and moved the back of metal comb across the frets to create the first distinctive Hawaiian steel guitar sounds. Almost 140 years later, most players now use a steel bar about three inches long to create the...