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Carver inspired to share Polynesian carv...

      Doug Christy, a 37-year veteran Maori wood carver for the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC) in Laie, Hawaii, learned his craft from his father, who also worked at the PCC for many years. Now he and the other senior carvers at the Center teach those same skills to a new generation of student workers. Christy explained that before hiring any of them, the department manager and senior carvers usually meet first with new student worker applicants to determine if they have the potential to learn carving. One thing stood out to Christy. He said, “For the...
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2019 inductees enshrined in Polynesian F...

    The Polynesian Football Hall of Fame (PFHOF) enshrined the Class of 2019 in their permanent display at the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC) on January 19, 2019 and recognized several other honorees. PCC president and CEO Alfred Grace welcomed all the honorees to the Center and pointed out our partnership with the PFHOF has been a natural fit since the inaugural Class of 2014. “Congratulations to all of you,” he said. “In acknowledging you, I acknowledge all of our Polynesian people who excel in every worthy endeavor they take on. “For 55 years we...
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Polynesian Cultural Center co-sponsors i...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up   For centuries the people of Polynesia have recognized the importance of breadfruit — called ‘ulu in Hawaiian and Samoan — as a source of food, lumber, and other materials. History and movie fans may remember Captain Bligh and HMS Bounty sailed to Tahiti in the late 1700s to retrieve breadfruit saplings and replant them in the Caribbean. Of course, that particular voyage ended in an infamous mutiny, but today breadfruit is widely used in tropical countries around the world — in more ways...
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“Huki” costumes take a year-...

  Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       Pictured above: The final versions of three Huki costume designs Roger Ewens created after consulting extensively with PCC cultural specialists and other members of the Huki committee: (left-right) a 1940s-era Hawaiian hula outfit (with ti-leaf skirt). An unusual blue Fijian finalé outfit, and a more “organic” look for a historical Tongan king costume.   Since the Polynesian Cultural Center staged the grand premiere of Huki: One ‘ohana sharing aloha on August 18, 2018,...
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Polynesian Cultural Center’s new “Huki” ...

  Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up       The Polynesian Cultural Center will officially launch the grand premiere of our new Huki: One ‘ohana sharing aloha canoe celebration on August 18, 2018. (‘Ohana means “family” in Hawaiian.) We present Huki each afternoon the Center is open at 2:30 on the freshwater lagoon near the Samoan Village. Huki is included in all PCC admission tickets. Huki succeeds Rainbows of Paradise canoe show The Center actually began a “soft” launch of Huki on July 12, 2018, when it replaced the...
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Cook Island performers return to Polynes...

Sign up for our Polynesian Cultural Center newsletters:  Email Sign Up           For the second consecutive year, the government of the Cook Islands has sent a performing group from its National Arts Theater and leaders to appear at the Polynesian Cultural Center through July 17, 2018. “We’re so excited to have them back again this year,” said Delsa Atoa Moe, PCC Vice President of Cultural Presentations. “It’s like a family reunion because we know and love them. We know they’re not just going to be a boost to our program, but also to our...