Ginger Lime Cooler is the answer to many questions. Like what is the most refreshing drink on a hot summer day. Or what’s an easy crowd pleaser for a backyard party? Or what can be made many different ways according to what you like and still be amazing?

We know how popular this awesome drink can be because it is the signature beverage at Pounders Restaurant, our lead eatery at the Hukilau Marketplace. In fact, we highly suggest you try it when you come to visit us at the Polynesian Cultural Center.

But just in case you need something chill right now, we are going to give you 2 completely different recipes that will both taste equally incredible plus a few other options to customize this cooler to your personal preferences. Let’s start with the fresh ingredients version. Obviously, we should start with the limes. Here’s a hint: to get the most juice from your fresh limes, let them sit out on the counter until they are room temperature before juicing them.

Version #1 – Fresh and full of aloha

photo of the 4 ingredients for Fresh Ginger Limeade

The main ingredients for Ginger Lime Cooler. Remember – choose EITHER white sugar or honey

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fresh squeezed lime juice (approximately 8 limes)
  • 1 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 1/4 – 1/2 tsp. freshly grated ginger
  • cold water 
Photograph of woman using an electric juicer

An electric juicer is a handy way to get the job done quickly, but you can always do it by hand. And while you’re at it, take the rinds, freeze them thoroughly and then grate them for lime zest, which can be easily stored for a couple of months in the freezer. Wonderful in cookies, frostings and even stir fry.

Instructions

  • Place 3/4 cup water and finely grated ginger in a small saucepan. Remember, a little bit goes a long way with ginger – you do NOT want to over do it on this.  Bring to a boil and cook for 2 minutes.
  • Remove from heat, and add sugar, stir.
  • Let it sit for approximately 5 minutes to let the sugar dissolve, stirring every minute.
  • Cool for 1/2 hour.
  • Add the lime juice to sugar water and stir.
  • Pour into a 2 quart pitcher.
  • Stir in enough cold water to fill the pitcher.
  • Serve over ice.

Here are some variations designed towards personal preferences:

  • For a healthier version, I substitute honey for the sugar. Follow the same instructions as Version 1, adding the honey first into the boiling water.
  • Want to really pump up the nutrition? Use coconut water for the last addition of water. I live on an island surrounded by coconut trees, so I have a constant fresh supply, but even using canned or bottled coconut water is a plus.
  • Would you prefer a little ‘pop’ of fizz? Use seltzer water instead of plain water for that last step.

 

Version #2 – Quick, but equally delicious

photo of ingredients for simple ginger limeade cooler

This simple version of Ginger Lime Cooler takes 1 container of frozen limeade concentrate, 1 16 oz. bottle of gingerade drink and 25 oz (smaller sized container) of sparkling water or seltzer.

Ingredients

  • 1 can of frozen limeade
  • 1 16 oz. bottle of cold gingerade (look in the bottled juice section of your grocery store)
  • Approximately 25 oz. of carbonated water

Instructions

  1. Open frozen limeade and pour (or scoop if fully frozen) into a 2 qt. pitcher.
  2. Add entire bottle of gingerade
  3. Use seltzer to fill up to 2 qts. Stir and serve,

 

 

Nina Jones, a mainland gal from way back, is now a transplanted Islander. With her husband of 43 years, she has lived in Laie since serving a mission at the Polynesian Cultural Center from 2014 – 2016. She now serves as the blog manager for the Center. Her hobbies include swimming, traveling, studying and writing about what she is learning from the various Polynesian cultures. Her blogs focus on their history, beliefs, practices and – as an added bonus – delicious food! To her, Polynesia is not just a place to visit, it is a way to live and she is very honored to be able to be a part of their amazing world.

%d bloggers like this: