Samoan Panikeke Recipe

Samoan Panikeke Recipe

 Click here to view our

TASTE of POLYNESIA

recipe video!

I’ve posted a lot of recipes in this blog for dinner and dessert items. Today, however, I’ll be switching gears a bit and talking about breakfast, the most important, and often most delicious part of the day. Few things compare to the lingering feeling of satisfaction that accompanies a good breakfast. Breakfast burritos, omelets, and French toast are all examples of the many foods that can be used to start a day off on the right foot. Bacon, hash browns, smoothies, bagels, crepes, and yogurt can all easily make a rough morning more bearable, and a good morning great. But have you ever heard about panikekes?

 

picture of panikeke courtesy of www.samoafood.com

Panikeke – photo courtesy of www.samoafood.com

 

One of my favorite breakfast foods is buttered pancakes. They’re easy to make, and my wife will tell you I often make them multiple times a week. This is where today’s recipe comes in.

Ever wish there was a more interesting way to eat or prepare pancakes? Perhaps not. Pancakes are already fantastic because people can easily add blueberries, bananas, chocolate chips, or any variety of things to them to improve upon their fluffy and bready taste. Chances are, however, that you’ve never tried Samoan panikeke, often referred to in English as “round pancakes.” (Pronounced pah-nee-kay-kay or pawn-kay-kay)

Admittedly, panikeke is not exclusively a breakfast food, but it is most definitely a food that will make your day, and it goes great with fruit, jams, whipped cream, syrup, or nutella!

Panikeke

To make it, you’ll need the following:

2 cups of flour

2 tablespoons baking powder

½ cup sugar

Pinch of salt

1 egg

½ cup of milk

Water

Oil for frying

Directions:

Heat up oil over medium heat (around 350 degrees)

Sift and combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt

Add the egg and milk

Mix everything up, and stir in enough water to make a thick batter (It should look like wet dough.)

Scrape up a tablespoon of the dough and drop it carefully into the oil (You can use a second spoon.)

Cook for about 3-5 minutes until they’re a dark golden brown

Remove from oil and place on paper towels or metal cooling rack

samoafood Great with your favorite warm beverage!

Great with your favorite warm beverage!

Tips:

  • You can make about 3 to 5 of these at a time in a sauce pan
  • You just need enough oil in the pan to cover the dough that you drop in
  • If the oil in the pan is the right temperature, the blobs of dough you drop in will round themselves out
  • If the oil heat is too high, the inside will be uncooked (open one up to check.)
  • If the oil heat is too low, the panikeke will be greasy

Variations:

Adding a teaspoon of vanilla or a mashed banana to the mixture before adding it to the oil is a great way to play with the taste of this particular dish. Feel free to experiment on your own too!

If you want some extra help making the panikeke, here’s a great video:

 

Hope you enjoy the panikeke! It makes for a fabulous treat.

The original recipe can be found here: SamoaFood.com

Peter

(Editor’s note: Eggs and milk are a more recent (and delicious) addition  to panikeke. Here is the recipe for Classic Panikeke—4 cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 – 2 cups water. The rest of the instructions are the same. Cooking in coconut oil may be a healthier alternative to vegetable oil. Keep in mind that experimenting and adapting for taste and preference is a Samoan characteristic so have fun! Hint: chocolate chips…)

This blog was originally posted on March 19, 2014


 
peterandwifeAuthor Bio

I’m Peter. I grew up in Seattle, but have been living in Hawaii and Japan for the last 4 years. I love traveling; I love learning about different cultures; I love food, and I love my wife.

We’re hoping to go to Korea next year, and graduate school the year after that. My life’s the best kind of dream, the one you don’t have to wake up from.

 

Sources:

http://www.amusingfoodie.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Breakfast.jpg

http://www.samoafood.com/2010/11/panikeke-lapotopoto-round-pancakes.html

http://www.samoapages.com (email thumbnail)

13 Responses to “Samoan Panikeke Recipe”

  1. Ruby says:

    Hello, thank you fur sharing. Would you by any chance have a recipe for skogi?

  2. Formally a Toilolo-Alapaileilei from Malaeloa Village in American Samoa. Love sharing recipes with my friends ans neighbors but i don’t have measurements, all done by eye.

    • fili says:

      Hi my name is Fili junior Campbell Livistone Manu and I am Samoan, Tongan, Maori, Tuvalu but I was born from Samoa and I was adopted to New Zealand 2014. I was only 10 yeas old when I came here. My nana loves making Samoan Panikeke and I helped her too.

  3. Alaifatu Fatialofa says:

    Um Hi peter may i get your last name i’m sorry but it’s for my “How To Do” project.

    Thank you!!

    • Nina Jones says:

      Peter Gregory was a blog writer for us while he was attending school at Brigham Young University – Hawaii. He has now graduated. We miss him – he’s a great blogger!

  4. fili says:

    Hi this is Ramsi and I am straight from Samoa Vaitele and I have 1 brother and we eat panikeke all the time. Panikeke is my favourite food for breakfast and I even eat it in New Zealand too. I go to Lynfield College High School and I hang out with Fili Manu

  5. fili says:

    My family just had panikeke for breakfast this morning, from Avondale

  6. K Taylor says:

    This is also traditionally a very Turkish dish. I grew up in a remote village in Northeast of Turkey; My grandmother and my mother, even, now myself have been cooking this for generations.You can eat them Savory or sweet (by pouring syrup over them or sprinkle with icing sugar.then sprinkle with diced coconut or pistachios)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: