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Some important things to know

Some important things to know

Submitted by: Nina Jones, Blog Writer

Current Status – Canoes and Tram Tours

Canoe landing closed

As a reminder, canoe rides from the Hukilau Marketplace are still closed until further notice. Guests with Luau tickets can ride the canoes after they clear the Ticket Entrance to the Islands.

Access to the canoe ride and Samoa is currently restricted to those with the Luau Package ticket only due to social distancing limitations. Guests with the Dinner/Show combo ticket do not have access at this time, unfortunately, but they can ride the tram tours.

Our Laie Tram Tours have resumed daily operations from 3:00 pm – 6:40 pm on Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri, and Sat. Tours depart between the Gateway and Ticket Entrance (same location as before) and guests do NOT need a ticket to ride the trams.

 

safety corner sign

MOLD

How common is mold in buildings?

Molds are very common in buildings and homes. Mold will grow in places with a lot of moisture, such as around leaks in roofs, windows, or pipes, or where there has been flooding. Mold grows well on paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, and wood products. Mold can also grow in dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery.

The most common indoor molds are CladosporiumPenicillium, and Aspergillus.

How do molds get in the indoor environment and how do they grow?

Mold is found both indoors and outdoors. Mold can enter your home through open doorways, windows, vents, and heating and air conditioning systems. Mold in the air outside can also attach itself to clothing, shoes, and pets can and be carried indoors. When mold spores drop on places where there is excessive moisture, such as where leakage may have occurred in roofs, pipes, walls, plant pots, or where there has been flooding, they will grow. Many building materials provide suitable nutrients that encourage mold to grow. Wet cellulose materials, including paper and paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, wood, and wood products, are particularly conducive for the growth of some molds. Other materials such as dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation materials, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery, commonly support mold growth.

How do you know if you have a mold problem?

Large mold infestations can usually be seen or smelled.

picture of mold courtesy of Civil Beat

Photo courtesy of Civil Beat

How do molds affect people?

Exposure to damp and moldy environments may cause a variety of health effects or none at all. Some people are sensitive to molds. For these people, exposure to molds can lead to symptoms such as stuffy nose, wheezing, and red or itchy eyes, or skin. Some people, such as those with allergies to molds or with asthma may have more intense reactions. Severe reactions may occur among workers exposed to large amounts of molds in occupational settings. Severe reactions may include fever and shortness of breath.

In 2004 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) found there was sufficient evidence to link indoor exposure to mold with upper respiratory tract symptoms, cough, and wheeze in otherwise healthy people; with asthma symptoms in people with asthma; and with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in individuals susceptible to that immune-mediated condition.

There is no blood test for mold.  Some physicians can do allergy testing for possible allergies to mold, but no clinically proven tests can pinpoint when or where a particular mold exposure took place.

How do you get the molds out of buildings, including homes, schools, and places of employment?

Mold growing in homes and buildings indicates that there is a problem with water or moisture. This is the first problem to address.

Remove moldy items from living areas.  Once mold starts to grow in carpet, insulation, ceiling tiles, drywall, or wallboard, the only way to deal with the problem is by removal and replacement.

If you choose to use bleach to clean up mold:

  • Never mix bleach with ammonia or other household cleaners. Mixing bleach with ammonia or other cleaning products will produce dangerous, toxic fumes.
  • Open windows and doors to provide fresh air.
  • Wear non-porous gloves and protective eyewear.
  • Small areas (such as a shower, or an area the size of a door) can often be cleaned by residents, but larger areas might need more professional help.  Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using bleach or any other cleaning product.

If you have an extensive amount of mold and you do not think you can manage the cleanup on your own, you may want to contact a professional who has experience in cleaning mold in buildings and homes.

Reference

https://www.cdc.gov/mold/faqs.htm