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Weekly Update for September 8, 2021

Introducing- Nephi Setoki

Submitted by: Sister Krisitne Saunders, Archives 

Nephi

Nephi Setoki was born in Western Samoa and raised there until he was 15, which is when his family moved to Hawaii. He attended Church College of Western Samoa (CCWS), and later graduated from Kahuku High School. It seems that as a student at Kahuku High School playing sports is expected. Nephi played volleyball. He also enjoyed recreational basketball and some competitive ping pong.  

So, how did this young man with his love of math and art end up as the Manager of eCommerce, Web Development, and Design at the Polynesian Cultural Center? 

The PCC is a center of learning

Nephi came to Hawaii with his parents and older siblings who were students at BYUH. He started working at the Center as a dancer at the night show and canoe pageant.  Throughout the years, he performed in three of the Center’s evening shows, including This is PolynesiaMana, and Horizons. He was a dancer with the Promo Team that traveled to selected cites, introducing the world to the delights of the Polynesian Cultural Center. He said, “It was a great experience sharing the Aloha of the islands with the world. 

The PCC is a place of miracles 

It was while dancing the canoe show one day, which at the time was staged in the lagoon inside Hale Aloha that Nephi collapsed. He woke up in the hospital with a brain tumor diagnosis. After surgery at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center, his symptoms disappeared and he was able to start the recovery process. “I was exactly where I needed to be that day, otherwise, the outcome would have been much different”. 

The PCC opens doors

As a dancer with the Promo Teams, Nephi traveled with and got to know people in the travel industry. One advantage he experienced as a Promo Teams dancer became apparent when he started working with the Center’s Sales Team. Nephi had already built a relationship and network with travel industry partners. He was now able to work with them on a different level. 

 The PCC is a place of caring

Because Nephi loved dancing, he learned to love and appreciate all of what the island cultures of Polynesia had to offer. But he truly embraced the Hawaiian culture. There were many people who invested time to teach and cultivate his understanding of the Hawaii way of life. Keith Awai worked with Nephi’s skill in hula and ultimately entered him in a prestigious island dance competition, which he won. He speaks with love and caring of Ellen Gay Dela Rosa and Cy Bridges. Also, Nephi loved the time he worked with Aunty Vai Faamaligi as an assistant at the night show. During his time in the Sales department, he was mentored by his good friend, Francis Ho Ching. “They all made it possible for Nephi to discover the talents he didn’t know he had. He can be a shy person, but watch the transition when he is on stage. These experiences made it possible for Nephi to move into a position where he is comfortable talking in front of people.

The PCC honors the hard work of others  

Nephi acknowledges that the preparation received during each stage of his career happened here, at BYUH and the Polynesian Cultural Center. He is where he is today because of the people who came before him. He said, “My job is easy because the people who came before us did a lot of the work. We are the legacy of those people.” 

The three words that describe Nephi are self-learner, loyal, and caring. He loves people, valuing the worth of all he meets. He and his wife of 26 years have 5 children. To conquer his fear of heights, Nephi enjoys hiking difficult trails and is working his way up to skydiving. His favorite quote, is from his father, “When the time of decision comes, it’s too late to make a decision!” 

  

Deaf Awareness Month

Submitted by: Delsa Moe, VP Cultural Presentations 

DeafAwareness

September is Deaf Awareness Month. One of the biggest challenges brought about by the pandemic and subsequent mask-wearing is not being able to read lips which makes communication more difficult. By applying these Tips for the Workplace, will be very helpful for our employees and guests who are deaf, have hearing impairment of various degrees, as well as for those who struggle with understanding the English language. 

 

safety corner sign

Heat Exhaustion 

Submitted by: Elder Tom Davis

Heat exhaustion results from the body’s inability to cool down and regulate its internal temperature. It is usually caused by continuous exposure to excessive heat that dehydrates the body. 

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include: 

  • Headache 
  • Fatigue 
  • Dizziness and fainting spells 
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Weak pulse 
  • Pale face 
  • Muscle cramps 

Symptoms of heatstroke: 

  • Behavioral changes (irritability, confusion, disorientation) 
  • Seizures 
  • Nausea and vomiting 
  • Muscle and abdominal cramps 
  • Weakness 

If left unattended, heat exhaustion can worsen and turn into heatstroke. Heat strokes have the potential to be life-threatening. It’s crucial to inform your employees about the signs, symptoms, and prevention of heatstroke. 

Heat exhaustion results from the body’s inability to cool down and regulate its internal temperature. It is usually caused by continuous exposure to excessive heat that dehydrates the body. 

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include: 

  • Headache 
  • Fatigue 
  • Dizziness and fainting spells 
  • Nausea and vomiting 
  • Weak pulse
  • Pale face 
  • Muscle cramps 

Symptoms of heatstroke: 

  • Behavioral changes (irritability, confusion, disorientation) 
  • Seizures 
  • Nausea and vomiting 
  • Muscle and abdominal cramps 
  • Weakness 

If left unattended, heat exhaustion can worsen and turn into heatstroke. Heat strokes have the potential to be life-threatening. It’s crucial to inform your employees about the signs, symptoms, and prevention of heatstroke. 

Heat Prevention